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Scripps developing Siba format, lines up new seasons

Siba in the KitchenScripps Networks International is further investing in emerging chefs Siba Mtongana and Reza Mahammad, revealing new shows and seasons for the pair.

The UK-based international content unit of US lifestyle channels giant Scripps Networks Interactive is working up a new format for Mtongana, Siba in the Kitchen (WT), and has greenlit a second season of Siba’s Table.

There will also be a pair of new seasons for the Reza: Spice Prince… franchise, Reza: Spice Prince of Thailand and Reza: Spince Prince of Vietnam.

This comes after the pair delivered 11% of all Food Network UK viewers in 2013, according to BARB UK stats. Their shows also attracted just under 45% of all Food Network viewers in South Africa.

SNI’s senior VP, content and marketing, UK and EMEA Nick Thorogood told TBI Siba in the Kitchen was being developed as a “follow-up” to Siba’s Table for Food Network’s international channels, with a larger focus the South African chef demonstrating dish preparations and how-to segments.

The 5x30mins series will shoot in August, and TX in the first quarter of next year.

Season two of Siba’s Table, meanwhile, will be 10x30mins. It shoots in Q1 2015 ahead of a Q3 launch. Season one was the first ever Scripps international original that broadcast on one of the firm’s US channels. It launched on Cooking Channel in April.

Reza Spice Prince of Thailand will be 7x30mins and launch on October 6, while Spice Prince of Vietnam will TX on October 15.

The show follows Indian-descended English chef as he travels to exotic locations finding new spices and the dishes they create.

“Reza and Siba are two people who absolutely epitomise what we’re trying to achieve to represents different people and different cuisines on screen,” said Thorogood.

There is currently wide-spanning debates over the levels and portrayals over ethnic minorities on UK screens. “At a time when there is so much discussion about diversity on screen, it’s great we’re bringing a range of difference faces and backgrounds on screen,” added Thorogood.